July 20, 2022

Season 4, Episode 3, Tea Time

Season 4, Episode 3, Tea Time

Eric and Gil have a Tea Time discussion with Chis, Jeremy, Cisco and Dylan

Transcript
Eric:

Hello and welcome to the Q lounge, I'm Eric

Gil:

and I'm Gil.

Eric:

join us as we discuss news stories and life situations, as they relate to the LGBTQIA plus experience, please visit us at theQloungepodcast.com and hit that subscribe button or listen wherever you get your podcasts. If you would like to follow us on social media, you can hit us up on Facebook @theQloungepodcast or on Instagram or Twitter @theQlounge. Hello, welcome to the Q lounge. I'm Eric

Gil:

and I'm Gil,

Eric:

and we are bringing you a specialty time. We are super excited to have our guests. We have returning Chris Gil's husband. Hello. We have Jeremy from season three, entrepreneur and operative director of pet products, pet luxury products. We have Dylan from season three, the model dancer. Hi, we have Cisco go boy, model underwear designer.

Cisco:

How's it going guys,

Eric:

Yeah. Thank you guys so much for joining us. We really appreciate it. This is just a fun chill thing, so yeah. Do you guys want to start like easy and tease it and warm it up? Or do you guys just wanna like Ram it in let's Ram

Dylan:

it in.

Eric:

What do you think about reclaiming words? And are there any words that you've reclaimed for yourself?

Gil:

Oh Lord. I let's see a word that I'm trying to reclaim is faggot. That's a word I really don't. I find it very dirty in a very offensive. I will probably cut a bitch. But it's a word I'm trying to reclaim. It's been one of those, I don't know. It's just a triggering word for me for more like childhood and stuff like that. But it's something I've been worth growing on or trying to be better, better and accepting and yeah,

Cisco:

So I guess the first one that comes to mind is fem. Okay. And the reason I say that is because When I was a small child, I guess I think like most of us was more into like the Barbie dolls and putting a towel on my head, like pretending it was a wig, this is when I was like probably three or four, and so my dad always used to tell me he looks so fem and like stopping so femme. And it was really like, I could sting of the word, but I didn't know what it meant at the time. And now just talking about looking back on it I, I just, I've kind, I've accepted. I am who I am. Who I, as a kid and I've always been this way. So that, that word fem now I feel like it's been, obviously with what's going on with women and the attack on women's rights. I just feel like that word isn't as sticking to me anymore. I don't know if

Eric:

that's a good answer, but no, it's a fine answer. It's your answer? That's great,

Dylan:

Could we do a more provocative question? I'm joking. Okay. I thought that'd be funny. No one liked it. Okay. I'm sorry. answer the question. Like I guess faggot was the first word that came to mind, but I don't know. I don't really feel like I need to reclaim any words. I just like to use them now. So like I'll occasionally call my twin brother a fag and then we'll laugh about it. But if, obviously if someone like they didn't know or that wasn't gay called me that I'd be like step off. But yeah, I, yeah. That's yeah. That's the word for me?

Gil:

Okay.

Jeremy:

I don't know. Honestly, I've never I don't think I've ever attempted to reclaim a word. Okay. It's I guess it's It's just never been something that's really bothered me more because I feel like, titles are something people give, but like whether you choose to wear it or not is your decision in regards to that I think when I was younger, I definitely had was more self-conscious of it, especially where fem or girly or stuff like that. I think when I was younger, that was parter, but now it's like at a point where I just, I don't know, I just don't

Eric:

care. No, that's awesome. Just like unbothered by it,

Chris:

personally I never re tried tried to reclaim a meaning of a word or anything, or but I have gotten a little bit more comfortable of. Being called girl, like G U R L I guess. Okay, girl. I'm not aware that I sound like a woman on the phone and falling on this podcast, but but I got uncomfortable just like being called girl, cuz I remember when I was like a little bit more younger even within the past couple of years.

Gil:

I'm not a girl, I'm a boy,

Chris:

but I'm like, eh, whatever, it don't matter.

Eric:

awesome. For me, I guess the word fag or faggot can be I guess what's the word? I can't think of the word right now. They could triggering. That's the word there can be a bit triggering. But I've actually worked on reclaiming those words personally. I actually like using those words now, but I'm only gonna use them with people that I know. And as a joke, I'm not gonna sit there and be demeaning to someone, but like how you use the word bitch and stuff like that. Again, only certain people can use bitch, like some CIS straight dude, better not be calling me a bitch. So same kind of thing. I do think reclaiming words is liberating in a lot of ways. So cuz you take the power away from those people trying to use those words. So they think they just become words at some point.

Gil:

So what's our opinion on queer cinema, TV and media. With regards to that, with reclaiming of words, with reclaiming of words, the word we evolved with the queer cinema and stuff like that and representation.

Eric:

I love queer cinema. I watch a lot of queer cinema I think you can definitely see the evolution of queer cinema to from back in the day from what my time to modern time. And I think now you're starting to see a little bit more representation or the attempt to have representation. Like you think about the heart stopper. There was more representation in that with trans and pan and bisexuality, cuz it's usually like the token gay boy or the token lesbian or that's how it used to be. So I think it's evolving and it's working on reclaiming and putting an end to certain stereotypes. don't know if that was a good answer, but yeah,

Gil:

no, that was a good answer.

Chris:

that was a good answer. Yes. Okay. My turn I love watching queer cinema and TV. I have quite a collection of DVDs. And Eric said, like the progress that has happened from, level of quality even, cause let's be real. There's all that, there's that? What is it? Latter days

Eric:

that it's I love that

Chris:

movie. It's fair. It's a good movie, but it's like the quality of the film ring. True photography is a little bit weird. So all the way to love Victor where it's I love Victor as like mass. What is it like mass introduction or distribution? Like it was actually in theaters and it was actually like for teens and stuff. So I feel like representation is increasing as well as the quality of story, not to say that, like low budget, queer cinema is not important because, giving a voice to those. But I think it's definitely gained a lot of

Eric:

progress and it's no longer quite as tragic as it used to be.

Chris:

yes. Yes. Instead of although one token, like you said, the one token and he ends up dying at the end or, single, or just being like an overly like damaged self damaging, like our, what is it called? There's a bunch of words I wanna pick, but I can't pick Glen but yeah. So I think it's definitely a lot of progress that we've made.

Eric:

Awesome.

Cisco:

I think it comes down to representation, as we're more visible and we're more represented in other areas and levels, obviously I feel like we're gonna be portrayed more accurately true.

Eric:

Yeah, for sure.

Chris:

And the range that we come in. Yeah.

Jeremy:

Yeah, my God, I love queer cinema. I really I agree. I think we're finally making a progression because like for the longest time we had three categories of movie. It was either like the two like aggressively masculine guys who just like. Both figure out they're gay by working on like a farm together or like

Gil:

building

Cisco:

a, like

Jeremy:

building a house or something.

Eric:

I think I've seen 20 movies with

Jeremy:

that storyline or it's like the tragic I story or the or like the gay sidekick that like helps revamp their girlfriend's life. And I like that we're getting more complex storylines. I really liked the movie. I saw one recently three months with Troye Sivan, which was like

Eric:

a, I have not seen that yet, but I want to

Jeremy:

see that so good. So good. And I love the way they portray the the the topic of HIV. Okay. And it. In the community and how things have changed and evolved so much. And just the discussions the movie had and the real, like they, the real key points that was trying to highlight, I thought were amazing. I also love I feel like a lot of times with foreign film, especially gay foreign film, you get new perspectives on what what it means to be gay in different parts of the world and different perspectives.

Eric:

Tons of gay foreign

Chris:

yes.

Gil:

Yeah.

Jeremy:

But yeah, no I like to, I like that we're getting more developed characters. I like that we're getting people that are having different life experiences through different lens is more complex storylines and storylines that actually really accurately represent the community and interactions between each other, as opposed to like our role interacting within the dominantly heterosexual

Eric:

world,

Dylan:

What was the question?

Gil:

Exactly?

Jeremy:

I was gonna ask the same thing.

Gil:

I don't even remember gay cinema. How do you feel like it's evolved since, how do you

Dylan:

feel like it's evolved

Eric:

and what's your opinion on queer cinema? How is it and how is

Dylan:

it evolved? I feel if you're gonna play a gay person, you should be a gay person in my opinion, until we're equal. And then also I don't watch a lot of gay cinema because I feel like most of the time the gay person is fetish, fetishized, fetish. Okay. Fetishized. And so I just feel so uncomfortable watching it, but the only time that I've seen a gay couple on TV and was like, it was so wholesome and so real. And so sweet was in Schitt's Creek. Okay. Yeah. Like the only time I was like rooting for a gay couple in my life was like, ah, like it was great, but I typically don't watch anything. That's I don't know. It's like gay cinema, okay. Because I'm just, I'm scared to be disappointed.

Eric:

That's fair. So

Dylan:

makes me a bad gay I'm sure.

Eric:

But yes, I want your card back right now.

Gil:

I'll email it. I'll mail it to you,

Cisco:

I would say I, whether it's something that's evolved or something that was done in the past I just think it's the, what's the key is that it's authentic. I think there's been some I guess I wouldn't say gay cinema, but some other like films that I'm thinking of that older that are pretty accurate, like par, like Paris is burning. I guess that's more so a documentary than it is a film, but obviously it's a very old film and I feel like every gay person should watch it. It's fantastic. And it's authentic. You really get an idea of, what people were living like back then in New York being a person of color. So yeah and yet, obviously back then, there were also some really bad stereotypes. Like one of the worst ones I think of was like revenge of the nerds. Wasn't there like a gay guy on. What was his

Eric:

name? Probably like those eighties

Jeremy:

movies

Cisco:

were, it was like a black guy on revenge. The nerds. Yeah. I'm old. See, I'm dating myself. I'm

Eric:

super, I'm saying I think I'm probably older than you, but I don't remember. I didn't watch the revenge of the nerds movies.

Cisco:

But yeah, so I think it just depends. I think it has evolved, you are seeing some more accurate portrayals, but I think there's been good ones in the past as well. Again, it's just more about more representation I would

Jeremy:

say.

Cisco:

Oh, and I did pose was dope. Again, that's not cinema

Eric:

pose is amazing.

Cisco:

Probably one of the best series like ever.

Eric:

Yeah. That's that's included.

Gil:

Yeah. I think I agree with pretty much everyone with that it's evolved a lot. And then Schitt's Creek absolutely adore, David's story and it's gotten better, within budgets and stuff like that. The representation's gotten better, the diversity within the, within it. And then also the just, it's not the typical coming out story. We've seen this done again to death. But it's starting off they're already out. Okay, awesome. Where do they go from here and is giving that inspiration, especially I'm thinking from that kid in Nebraska or suddenly, I'm in a blue bubble, I've been in the bay area, grew up here. Pride's always been something on TV since I was a child. That's just part of the culture here, but for somebody who's not from a big city, it. It's any kind of show will, and grace, you, I know it's problematic, but we're looking at it from a 20, 22 eyes and evolution since. So yeah. It's easy to critique, but I like where we're going and at least taking positive strides, at least with that, even though politics is opposite direction right now. But yeah, I like where we're going.

Eric:

Cool. So what is your relationship with urban dictionary? Do you use it and how often do you use it? Do you think it's a good thing to have

Gil:

I personally have not used it in a long time, probably when I was using Ask Jeevs or OK. I know of it. Like I remember it I. Asked people more of like recent slang and stuff like that, where I just, I wasn't aware of more, so from the gen Z, I'm a millennial I'm on the older half of it. So I, I'm starting to slowly take myself at work. I'm hiring kids who are, born after I already graduated high school. After so it's been very entertaining with that coming to realization, but I do not use the urban dictionary.

Cisco:

I think I looked up in the urban dictionary a couple weeks ago. Coincidentally

Jeremy:

bootys

Cisco:

I was telling my daughter that I was like, yeah, I'm pretty sure it's in there. I don't know what brought up the conversation about it. So I did look it up, but I don't typically look at the urban dictionary. I think I hear about it in passing in like a news article or something, but yeah,

Dylan:

I guess I use it occasionally. That's

Gil:

it? I dunno what else to say?

Jeremy:

I don't know. Not regularly. Maybe if I'm unfamiliar with what, gen Z kids are saying no I'll look it up from time to time, but not on the regular. No,

Chris:

no, I. I'm more ask a, ask some of my peers, like what does this mean? I think the last thing that I ever looked on it was like six years, seven years ago, to be honest. Wow.

Eric:

Okay. I use it from time to time. Not a whole lot. Probably more than any of you guys do, but not a whole lot of, I probably look at it like maybe like once a month or once every other month or something, sometimes I'm like, I don't know what that means. And I like to try to have the, my pulse on what the kids are talking about these days. But what

Chris:

does sus mean? mean

Gil:

how do you use this in a sentence? Sus

Chris:

how

Gil:

do you spell sus? Speaking of chart to being young, what's on your playlist, Eric, what do you listen to at the moment?

Jeremy:

At the moment? Yes.

Eric:

I am listening to a lot of K-pop and a lot of black pink, and I am listening to Dove Cameron. Yeah, I think we just talked about this on our last episode. obviously, I'm always listening to Janet Jackson cuz she's just a permanent on my playlist and I'm listening to a lot of Ariana Grande. Yeah. That's probably the bulk of my playlist is a lot of pop right now. A lot of pop divas. And K-pop

Chris:

I'm a fun one. So I have I mean listen to techno trans progressive electronica a lot. But I recently have Yodel song. I have a Jo yo

Gil:

too.

Eric:

I know Yodel song, my

Chris:

poor husband I have some French and some Italian pop songs and stuff like that. And some Russian ones. So I, I'm all over the place in terms of like low kill if that makes sense, but yeah. That's pretty much it really, oh some Eurovision songs. I love Eurovision. It's amazing. And I do have my angsty playlist, which is like Marilyn mans and disturbed Okay.

Jeremy:

Lately my playlists have been a little weird lately actually. Like not the usual, I'm going to a Quincenera at the end of the month. So I've been listening to a lot of like old school, Latin, like cumbia music

Cisco:

were just talking about that. yeah.

Jeremy:

So my playlist has been made up of a lot of like vintage Latin music as in recently. But I think besides that I've been listening to Billy Eilish more. She's never been somebody I've spent a ton of time listening to a little bit here and there, but I've been listening to more of her music lately. And then I'm always happy with like singer songwriter music, so but yeah, mainly.

Eric:

Cool. Awesome.

Dylan:

Well, lady Gaga is my queen. Nice. Yes. And but I've been listening to a lot of Britney Spears since 20, 20 2020 was the year I'm like, let's just be gay and just be super gay about it. And so I never felt, I never allowed myself as like a kid to listen to Britney Spears. Cause it was too gay. And in fact I felt bad for even listening to female singers. I'm like, oh, that's too gay. And so I loved Britney Spears I've I always knew I loved her, but I just never could listen to her. And then Kim pets and let's see who else. Dua Lipa good. And Megan de stallion.

Eric:

Yeah. She's on my playlist a lot.

Dylan:

The sweetest pie oh, it's so good. Me. I freaking, yeah. Anyway. We'll be here all day. Anyway. Yeah.

Eric:

it's great song,

Jeremy:

I

Cisco:

have to agree with Dylan, like Kim Petris. I freaking love Kim. Petris love her.

Jeremy:

Let's see. Oh, I like Charlie XCX. She's

Cisco:

freaking so yes. Love her. I like the new chain smokers album. I haven't heard it. I like the chain smokers. It's really good. It's really good. The new Drake I've been listening to the new Drake album and oh, the new Beyonce

Eric:

song. Of course. I love that new Beyonce song. It is a little banger. It came

Cisco:

right at the right time. Cuz we needed it.

Jeremy:

We needed the best song. yeah, it's really good.

Cisco:

That's big

Jeremy:

from Eric

Eric:

yeah. Cause I'm not typically a Beyonce fan, but I heard it and I was like, oh, this song's a banger. Like I gotta download this song right now. So yeah.

Cisco:

I'm not like a crazy like beehive fan, but I like Beyonce of course. Like how

Eric:

could you not? But I get stung and attack by the bees all the time. Yeah. I'm sure they don't play. No, they don't. no.

Gil:

Oh my God. My, my playlist has been so all over the place right now. So I'm like stuff from Isaac Dunbar, a little bit newer. I've been listening to a lot of yay. Yeah. Yas. I have my Patsy client on my playlist right now. Annie Lenox, always Gaga. We're gonna be seeing Gaga in September. She's coming out here. So I'm super thrilled. Oh, awesome. Yes, I know and then yeah, zoom from early eighties. So I've just been I don't know why it really, since this year just been a little bit the place for my. Artists from older to newer and yeah, I don't know why I've just been all over, but yeah, that's been my playlist right now. Cool.

Eric:

Very cool. So what do you think is the importance of queer spaces?

Gil:

Like

Chris:

clubs or

Eric:

Queer safe spaces, clubs, coffee shops, like bookstores.

Chris:

This is a deep question.

Dylan:

We all know bookstores are full gay. They're all gay.

Gil:

Yeah.

Cisco:

In every back room in a bookstore.

Gil:

God, I think it's a, I think it's a must. It's one of, it's still a thing. I know, like I sought out for them or I think that's why, like when pulse. What are we on four, four years, AF five years after the shooting. Like it hit such close home, even though it wasn't, I've never been there. Never, but it was, I considered the club, a safe space, that's where I got to be me and dance. And, I wasn't the best dancer like you, Eric, when we needs to go. But I was having my little jams, little alcohol, little box people go from a six to a seven. Why not? Like that was a safe space to me. And, I consider that cafes for me is another little safe space. We streaming, oh, maybe we're gonna touch hands at the pouring a milk near each other, I still think of course, as I'm covered up with headphones and unapproachable, but I believe in the safe spaces, I, even if it's just creating like that space at your own home for someone else and them realizing like, oh, I could come here. Just be me. Yeah, cuz I know. Our culture or like the gay culture arts feel like it's very verbal. And like we pass it down to the next person. When we meet them, we meet a young gay it's oh, here, this is the knowledge could just know. It's not like it's ton in school. It would be like one of the last places you

Eric:

can't in school at all,

Gil:

you know how to be a good gay guy or how to be a good lesbian or how to be whatever it's very verbal. So you need those safe spaces to do it.

Cisco:

I think gay, safe spaces are incredibly important. I think now more so than ever. I think we were getting to a point, especially like when gay marriage was approved or when it was decided upon I felt like we were really making progress and I felt the country was really opening up to gay people and just really accepting us, but, obviously. Things have taken a turn for the worst. And I think it's even more important now to realize our sense of community together. And how ultimately we are responsible for one another, because I just, I feel like gay LGBTQ people are really the target of a lot of hate right now. And having those safe spaces where we can relax, be ourselves, hold our boyfriend's hand, or, I'm big on like holding hands in public. I'm not like the make out in public, but holding hands. And it's worrisome to like really do that depending on where you live and where you're at. Having those spaces are really important now more than ever.

Dylan:

of course. I feel like this question was for me. Is this

Gil:

for me? Absolutely. Sure.

Cisco:

Absolutely.

Dylan:

A hundred percent raging against the wrong people in my gay bar.

Eric:

We have talked about this haven't we? You and I, yeah, we have,

Dylan:

I'm like, this is for me.

Eric:

I do have a question on here for you though. Oh, stop. We might get to it later.

Jeremy:

okay.

Dylan:

It's the 18th question. All right. So there, it's obviously important. And then I think also like we do as a community also to make sure that like people who aren't. I know it's like it, I don't know how it looks with me saying it, but people who aren't white and like making sure that everyone, regardless of how they look is welcomed into a queer or gay space. But straight people. I think that's an obvious no for me. Everyone will probably agree with that, but I just feel if it's gonna be gay, let's be gay, or queer. Yeah. Cause I just think if we personally I feel like if you let one end, then other people don't wanna come in and it just then dilutes it and it just becomes a zoo and they just come in to look at the zoo. Okay. I don't know. I'm sensing a lot of

Eric:

hostility no, I'm taking in your answer. Do you agree?

Dylan:

OK. The silence like always freaks me out. I'm like, am I saying

Eric:

something wrong? No, you're not. You're anyway, you're giving your opinion in your truth and that's beautiful. So thank

Jeremy:

you so much,

Cisco:

Dylan, you kind, you make a good point in some cases I have to admit, like I've gotten irritated when when I see a lot of I dunno if I should say this or not, but like straight go-go dancers, at the clubs that

Dylan:

makes me so angry.

Cisco:

So angry. Dylan. I know and. Like I've seen them backstage and they're gross. You don't wanna dudes are gross in gross. Touch him there. Like I, no, it's just gross. And I feel like it's disrespectful of the community. And then they I shouldn't say all of 'em. I don't wanna stereotype anybody, but I just feel like the club scene has been overrun with a lot of straight men dancing for gay guys. It's gay

Gil:

baiting.

Dylan:

It is. Yeah. Yeah. People do it on TikTok and then they make money.

Cisco:

And then you think maybe that's maybe we're making progress where like straight guys are comfortable with that kind of thing. Maybe it's a good thing, but no, and I guess it can be

Jeremy:

argued maybe both sides

Cisco:

for,

Eric:

I dunno.

Jeremy:

I definitely think it's important to have safe spaces for sure. I know, especially when I was like in the earlier part of my coming out process and stuff like that, it was nice to be able to have places to actively explore what it meant to be gay and, be in a place where you felt like you were safe to do and be able to take it at whatever pace you wanted to I met a lot of really great people through gay, safe spaces, like bars and clubs and stuff like that really, that helped me. Through the earlier point in my life with, coming to terms of acceptance, learning about the community giving me a space to ask questions and stuff like that. So I definitely think it's important. I think as far as what gay safe spaces are turning into now, I don't know. It's a tough one because it's it seems like a logical progression, as we're trying to like work towards equality and stuff like that, we're finding more and more that like you're seeing more and more with younger generations of gays. They're venturing outside of the community they're integrating and they're getting involved in stuff outside of our bars as well. There's still a lot of them that show up, but. It's it's in a different SP I think a lot of them are dealing with very different situations than we are dealing with. I feel like I fell on the cusp in a lot of ways with this kind of stuff. So I remember a time when it was really not safe to be having like being very openly gay But I also have witnessed how that has shifted dramatically and kids falling into more complex categories than existed. They're having more complex conversations than we ever did. You're finding more and more people are open and fluid and falling into a whole genre of categories that did not really. I, we weren't having conversations about before. So with that, and this adjustment and identity, it's also changing how queer spaces operate. because for example, maybe you have, it's just, maybe you have a queer person who is. Dating a straight person is that person not welcome to be actively involved in the community or take space in the bar? I think there's certain times and events and stuff like that, where it's like an interesting and complex discussion, cuz there are gay Barss that have things like dark rooms and stuff like that. And you hear about these kind of things being shut down because people ended up in places they did not want to be in or they got involved in situations. They weren't quite prepared for. There's been bars that have been closed down. There's been bars that have been sued because of people that ended up in you. Girls or straight guys ending up in situations they were not prepared for when they entered. I think to exclude people from a space is really counterintuitive because we're sitting here demanding equality, and then we're also demanding separation at the same time. It's there is not a world in which there could be a straight, exclusive bar or a female exclusive bar or a male exclusive bar where that would be tolerated or not considered some form of discrimination. I think it's about having conversations about being respectful about understanding the place you're in understanding that's the case. I think if you wanna have events that are specifically designated to focusing on conversations of queer topics or stuff like that. Yeah, absolutely. Have those kind of there have conferences have meeting spaces, do stuff like that. But I think to take a public space like a bar. And make it exclusive. It's gonna be it. It's not really actively promoting equality.

Chris:

That was deep. I loved that A safe space. I'm a little on the fence because a safe space could be somebody's home because myself growing up in a more conservative family and not necessary in a blue bubble Gill or any of you potentially. So my safe space was at my friend's home. Like my, her mom was just like, you could be, you. Whatever, and I felt really safe to go to her place. So that was that as a safe space was very important to me. Being, like a young queer gay kid. So there's definitely that, but there's definitely the fence of the club because yes, I'm okay. I'm okay with like straight people being in the club, like I'm, as long as you're not trying to start anything, you're not trying to like, be like, oh, how dare you look at me? It's just, as long as you're being respectful of everybody's person, regardless of how they identify or what they are or whatever. The only thing is though I do get annoyed is that when there's a lot of straight guys going to gay clubs, because they're hitting on our friends and cuz the gay club is considered a safe space for the women as well. In that good part. And there is a level because it's become a lot more popular for them because they know, oh, that's where the women go. So then they go there to hit on girls, but yet they can bring in that very close-minded ma macho mentality. And then they'll be like, oh, like

Gil:

I'm cool with it, but just don't

Chris:

hit on me. And first of all, you're Foy like stop,

Cisco:

right. Don't flatter yourself. Yeah.

Gil:

No, like

Chris:

you gross so it depends the safe space can be anywhere. It could be a cafe. It could be it could be really important. Gay community centers actually providing gay resources or queer resources or whatever. L G B T whatever, the alphabet mafia, resources that other, places they might not be able to get that from. So I think it's important, but I also believe that there should be a level of respect, not tolerance because tolerance is different between tolerance and acceptance. So as long as you're respecting everybody, not trying to start anything, then you do you

Eric:

yeah. Good point. Yeah. I actually have issues with people are saying, oh, people throw tolerance around. I'm like, no, it's not. Tolerance is shit. Don't. Bring that I tolerate

Chris:

my coworker. I,

Eric:

I accept exactly

Jeremy:

accept. exactly.

Eric:

I've been oscillating back and forth on this one since recent events. I've mean I speaking just of a club specifically. Like I have always loved club life, as soon as the first time I went to a gay bar, it was like the greatest thing in the world. I just like danced and no one judged me for dancing. And I like literally danced for three hours. I think I can be like completely super sober and the only person on the dance floor and I will completely dance for hours because I feel safe there. I don't feel judged. Yeah. And I can just be me. So I think it's important to have it cuz you have that ability to be you and the new person coming in, like sees, oh wow. Like I have this ability to be me, people aren't really judging me. I do think though that a lot of times. The gay bars can ne not necessarily be fully inclusionary of all the Q I a plus community and I think that's really sad. And so I think just as a community in ourselves, we need to be open to everyone that's under our umbrella as well. Fair specifically like the trans community and people of color. Yeah.

Jeremy:

I don't know, like I,

Eric:

in some ways I think it's totally a respect thing and I completely do agree with that. And for the longest time I was like, yeah, cool. Let the straight guys come in, let the straight people come in, as long as they're having fun, blah, blah, blah. But I've also had, I've seen the whole thing of dude, don't hit on me and like, why is that dude looking at me? I'm like, you're in a fucking gay bar, get over yourself. And like trying to start shit and trying to start drama. We don't need that here. We have to deal with that on our daily lives, as it is, don't come into our space and pervert it. I do agree that a safe space can pretty much be anywhere this podcast was yeah. Invented to be that as well. I've also now started now that I've come to terms and like really fully accepted myself cuz I've dealt with so much internalized homophobia personally. Now, like I am all about being. Fabulous. And over the top in some of my presentation and I go to the gym wearing like super gay tank tops and everything else, cuz I'm like, you know what? Like this can create a safe space for other people because they can see oh yeah, there's someone else here that or whatever else. Or when I have my nails painted, I've had people like young people at the store oh my gosh, I love your nails. And talk to me on the low because they can't like talk to like their parents that are there, but they can like, I'm like, okay, cool. So I don't know. I think they're very important to have, I know there's a whole movement of oh, we don't need them anymore. We just need to all adapting to society and just all like intermingle. And that's a beautiful thought, but we're not there. So until that's actually a re a reality that could happen. I do think that they're important. And I think that's about

Gil:

where I say, no, you bring up an interesting before I go on the next question, an interesting point, because that's been something that's been brewing up here where they've been talking about is the cash flow necessary. Is that even an important thing anymore? And to me, I found it almost insulting but a lot of the newer people, like I said, different perspectives are asking that question. What's the purpose of the Castro, if we're everywhere throughout the city or throughout, the bay area. And I, this kind of leads to my next question. Is there such thing as too woke where you're just way over the top on that,

Eric:

Okay. So I'm back and forth on this too. I don't know that. I think. I don't know that. I think you can be too woke per se, but I think the way in which you use your wokeness can be a little out there. Like I have friends who are like CIS white people who will tell me that how I should be feeling as a Latino, because oh, I read this. And now I'm woke and you should be mad about this and you should be no, you don't get to dictate me to me, my experiences. So in that regard, I think you can be a little too woke, but I don't know that you're being too woke. I just think you don't know your place or you are undermining my experience because you're trying to make yourself feel better, whether it's through guilt or whatever. So I think that's how I feel about the wokeness,

Chris:

too woke. I struggle with this phrase for time to time, because there like to echo what Eric is saying you can be aware as, a cisgendered or person to be like, oh, this is what the, some people are experiencing, but I may, I'm like I'm Latino in white passing. So my experience is obviously gonna be different from Eric and Y Cisco, maybe, or Dylan or Jeremy or Gill, like it's just, it could be very different. So to be too woke I think that there's a fine line, cuz you could be woke and you're aware, but it's. When you start dictating how other people's experiences should be controlled or should be felt or should be anything then, okay. You're not necessarily truly woke. You're just aware of what's going on. And maybe you're just exterminating or sorry. Yeah. Notating, what is it? Illuminating it onto other people's lives on how you think they should feel. Does that make sense? It can go both ways for me. Okay.

Jeremy:

For me, I don't think you can be too woke. I think at least from my understanding of being woke and the way I perceive it is that being woke is being aware of generalized social issues that are something people talk about, more than one person is experiencing it. It seems like a pretty frequent phenomena. I think being woke, just being aware of social issues and being inclined to educate yourself on what other people are dealing with. And how things like culture, appearance, belief, and sexuality, stuff like that, can all play a role in how these people are perceived or like the problems they face on a daily basis. But I think again, it's good to be aware and present with what's happening in the world around you. But I also think to treat that as like a catchall for everybody's really not effective, I think focus on individualized relationships and asking questions or listening. I find that listening's just a really good way to. Understand and connect with people and understand their personalized experience because the reality is we're not all experiencing the same thing. you have six gay men here who have all had probably varying experiences with being gay. And other factors that come into play, whether that's race religious upbringing, education, social status, stuff like that, these all play factors in, personal life experiences. I don't think you can generalize that. I think being woke is understanding generalized discussions that are occurring frequent occurrences within our culture and our society. But I think there's a difference between being woke and being attentive to conversations you're having with individuals.

Gil:

That's

Cisco:

a good answer, Jeremy. That was good. Very intelligent. I love

Gil:

it. Thank you.

Dylan:

Of course, like anything in extremes can be bad. And I do think sometimes people like read a news article and then they start to weaponize it. So I guess that's anything can get too crazy. So for example, like my friend told me this you can go so far left that, then you go, cause it's almost like a circle

Eric:

Does that make sense? Pendulum.

Dylan:

And I think when people weaponize stuff like that's when becomes unproductive. So I think educating other people is different than being like, you're a bad person because of this and that.

Gil:

So anyway,

Cisco:

I feel like the,

Gil:

the meaning

Cisco:

word woke or like the feeling behind it. I feel like the word has been hijacked and I feel like the word woke has been made to like, seem like it's something bad. more, more so recently I would say or mocking people for being woke, and I think being woke is a fantastic thing. And I feel like Eric, like you gave that example of some white couple that was telling you how to fill as a Latino, if they're telling you how to feel as a Latino, they're not

Jeremy:

woke Yeah.

Cisco:

They're just not. Okay. And so it's a matter of us, like what Jeremy said is just listening to one, one another Stop talking and just open your ears and listen to what people are saying, let them talk, tell their story, but I think being woke is a good thing. I think we, we need more of it and I'll give a really good example of how I feel like I've become really woke is again like going back to attack on women's rights. On overturning of abortion. I have a 25 year old daughter, so that's it's very personal to me and probably about a year ago, I like, I stopped using the word bitch to refer to a woman but

Gil:

I wouldn't

Cisco:

use it a lot, but it was like a lady at work or something like God, or like some rude lady at, at the mall or so she's such a, but a bitch, but like I really have stopped referring to women as. Bitch at all. If I, if there's a woman or a female, I don't like I'll call her an asshole. So I think taking it to those kind of levels, maybe someone might think is a little bit extreme, but I even correct my husband, if he refers to a woman like, ah, she was a bitch, what a bitch. And I'm like, don't say that about women. So I guess you could say maybe I'm too woke. I don't know, but I don't know. That's just my thought on it.

Gil:

Okay. Yeah. It. I it's a, it's an interesting line to me. Because I want everyone to be as woke as humanly possible because it kinda makes people have the open dialogue, which I definitely agree. We need it. And I think is still part of the, how do you, is this another way of people remastering their ignorance as well saying that or giving Aoke a bad name, which I also completely agree cuz same thing. Like Eric I've had that when I was in Seattle getting told, how do you not speak Spanish? And I'm like, my family's been here so long. The board across us. I don't, we were, Latinos who had to blend in American English. You had to, you know how to speak it. So that's an experience that we don't speak Spanish. Yeah. We've been in this country or absorbed, I should say. For so long that it's Spanish is not native to us. But my experience, like I said, as a biracial also, so I got it from both fronts, but like I said, I had so many TRICS by how do you not know? How are you not fighting. We've been here so long. It's not native. But I've also, like I said, it's, I'd rather people be a little bit more aware, at least asking the what's your thoughts on X, Y, Z than? Oh I read in Fox news or, overheard something from my Trump part or neighbor on your experience kind of thing. I'd rather the open dialogue directly. And I think we just need back to basics as a community, but also as a just nation overall, it's okay to talk to people and be vulnerable. I think that's also what it leads to.

Eric:

how has personal trauma influenced or dictated your life or has it had any influence or in your life?

Gil:

Yes, it definitely has. It, like as simple, like my I'll be very honest. Like I, my parents divorced when I was much younger went to see my dad, cheating on my mother. Some of that trauma from growing up definitely affected the way I looked at relationships, not just the gay layer and the minority layer, but also personal home and the back and forth of seeing a broken house. Chris and I have been together 13 years, we've a lot longer than a lot of, some people, but it took me eight years to get to the point of, okay, let's move on to marriage. Where Tim up pole was like, oh my God, I met you yesterday. Let's get married six months later. Now it's terrifying the thought of that. That's something that definitely affected relationships that I've, just any, just that kind of relationship on top of other trust issues and wanting to settle down and stuff like that. Yeah, that's some of the early trauma. one, let's just pick one per part of my iceberg.

Cisco:

Yeah, I feel like I there's been certain traumatic events. I think that have really changed course of my life. I think the one that sticks out the most, probably that changed things was just financially when I used to be a mortgage broker back in 2000 from like 2004 to 2008. And so like when the mortgage industry collapsed I pretty much lost like my entire career. I lost my home. I, I. I decided to go a completely direction, like different direction career wise. And it led me to actually start my underwear line. Because at that point I had just lost everything. So I had really nothing else to lose. And that really got me on the road to being an entrepreneur essentially. Yeah, I think it's all in the way that you handle it. It was pretty devastating for me. I just felt like such a loser, like moving home with my parents when I was in my thirties looking back, it was something that just turned into a positive eventually. So I don't know if that's that traumatic. It's not, it wasn't like a death or anything, but like financially losing everything is

Eric:

pretty yeah. Everyone has different traumas,

Dylan:

oh, I don't know. I guess my dad called me stupid a lot. Basically I guess like my biggest trauma, I don't know this, it just feels weird to talk about it to a group of mostly strangers. My dad was just like so bad to me and I would just basically just make me feel like I was the dumbest thing in the world. And so in order to prove him wrong, I really applied myself. And then even though I was like a 4.0 student and all that, it just didn't matter. To him. Cause right when I achieved it, he's oh does it matter? I'm like, okay. So clearly he's an asshole. And I just knew that I wasn't dumb, but I still like sometimes struggle with being seen as stupid or being seen as not educated enough or as I'm talking right now, I'm like, oh my God am I talking like. in a direct sentence, is how I'm talking. Does it make sense or is it, or am I talking in circles? So I even still have have anxiety of how do I, am I speaking properly? So yeah,

Jeremy:

Yeah, for sure. I don't think anybody gets through life without some sort of trauma. For me, I think probably the last Three to four years of my life have been like a big period of exploring that and trying to understand it on a very deep level. It's very interesting because I feel like I was in a pretty, significant, long term relationship. I was married for five years. And it's very interesting through the course of having a relationship where you live with somebody, you really begin to see parts of yourself that you may have not known were there, you begin to, you're sharing a life with somebody. You begin to push each other's buttons and find stuff that you didn't know was there. And I think for me, a lot of it had to do with just a. Growing up in a household where I didn't feel like I had a lot of control or autonomy over myself. And also growing up in a house that felt like love was a very conditional thing to a certain extent, I watched my older brother get kicked out of the house and completely cut off from the family just no contact for almost seven, eight years. And this was occurring when I was probably about 10, 11 years old. I was starting to come to awareness about being gay. And that was around the time I really understood that I was gay And so at that point, I was beginning to have an understanding that there, there was a very strong possibility I was gonna lose my family and lose contact with them and wasn't gonna really have anybody. So I think in my earlier years of adulthood, that really caused me to have a large fear of abandonment. And I think that also created a sense of needing a sense of control, and especially when you're in a relationship with somebody else, that's not really how that functions and, having control issues like that can cause a lot of problems and a lot of tension. And I think for me through the course of that relationship, that was really a wake up call. That was when I started going to therapy and addressing a lot of these issues and starting to talk with somebody about it and understand. Why I was reacting to situations the way I was, why I was feeling the way I was, why I couldn't find happiness with really any of the relationships in my life or a sense of fulfillment with them. And I've been very fortunate to work with some really amazing therapists that have helped me out a ton and really changed my perspective on a lot of that and been able to help me get to a place where I realized like that I don't always need to have that sense of control.

Chris:

I don't think I've been through something super traumatic. I mean that I was aware of, it could also be very. Blissful ignorance to the situation that could PO potentially happen. My sisters and I like we're both like much like Gil, like we come from a divorce home, but I was four when my parents divorced. So I don't really remember it per se. But my sisters stairs they currently feel like they probably overcompensate as moms. Okay. To be like, oh, I don't wanna have like my children's feeling of abandonment and all that stuff. But I can, I guess my, it's not really, I don't know if it's trauma. Again, blissful ignorance of that. It could be a trauma, but I can say that my love language is words of affirmation and physical touch, and it probably could stem from maybe my when I was living with my dad, cuz my dad got primary custody of me and my sisters were living. Albuquerque this city with my mom and he wasn't really around in terms of like I had my grandpa who I was really close with. But maybe I never heard them like, tell me, I love, they, I love you. Or, or maybe like hugs and stuff like that a lot growing up. So maybe that's what it is. And then obviously when I started becoming an adult and learning it the hard way that could be somewhat dramatic just building up walls to protect myself, to make sure that I'm not taking advantage of and stuff like that. Not hugely traumatic, like some others, but,

Gil:

I, I don't know.

Eric:

Yeah. I would definitely say trauma has shaped me to the person I am, whether that's good or bad. Being someone who's been like sexually assaulted and molested as a child and stuff like that is definitely shaped who I am as a person and how I interact with people and the walls that I have up and control issues myself and not wanting anyone, not wanting to be in situations where I might lose control. And then my friends have to like, make sure that I don't get too drunk and start acting too much of a fool. So like I rarely. Let myself get to those points or let loose, because I'm always afraid of who's gonna do what to me, and who's gonna do this to me. And just the way I view myself and all the self hatred and self-loathing, I've had for myself throughout most of my life the way like when someone actually pays attention to me, I'm thinking like, okay, they just want sex because I've been conditioned in some ways. I've been doing a lot of work on breaking that those cycles and actually like getting to know myself again and being there for myself and going back to be there for that. The younger me who was traumatized and didn't know what necessarily what was going on at the time. So I think that's, as far as I really wanna go with that one. So

Gil:

you're comfortable with yeah no, it's a lot. Perfect. Yeah. How do you wanna be remembered?

Eric:

How do I wanna be remembered? That's a good one. Honestly, like I wanna be remembered for someone who made everyone feel safe. I created a safe space for everybody so that they could be themselves and that people felt that they could live authentically as themselves around me. And people would know that they are great in their own skin and just be someone who was very supportive of others. I think that's how I wanted

Jeremy:

to remember.

Gil:

You did a good job when I was a young gay you. Thank you. You created a safe space. Oh

Chris:

me? Yes. Yeah. Sorry.

Dylan:

Probably that I was

Chris:

just funding

Dylan:

quirk. Awesome.

Chris:

Like some of my associates at work are, they're like, you're just so weird. And you just like cuz sometimes I'll like randomly dance or I'll, or I just laugh about like I bump into something and I'll laugh at myself cuz you know, like life it's not too serious, you can't take life too seriously. So they're like, oh you always, you're weird. so I guess I wanna remember it as the quirky weird one,

Jeremy:

Do I wanna be remembered for honestly, probably I'd really to be remembered for being a very happy person. I wanna be remembered for somebody that brings a lot of good energy to any situation I'm involved in. I wanna be remembered for being kind I want to be remembered for whatever I end up doing with my life as far as like work and stuff like that. I would just like to be remembered as somebody that worked really hard to be a part of a team and to make sure everybody was treated fairly and with dignity. So yeah, that

Eric:

probably

Dylan:

I would like to be remembered for being different.

Cisco:

I think I would like to be remembered as being a good father somebody who stuck to his commitments and just raise another good human being that will put some good out into the world.

Gil:

Yeah. I love that. That's great. I like that one. For me, I just wanna be remembered as, and I feel like I follow through with the, my father. My grandfather was very, he lived his life to the fulls, to, to his comfortability, to, there was no regret. And that's something that I, like I said, if I died yesterday or tomorrow, or tomorrow like I have no regrets. I have nothing to be like, oh, I wish I could have done X, Y, Z. I've done everything I really need to do. And I've always been happy the way I've lived, the way I live.

Cisco:

Awesome.

Eric:

You have time for one last question. Sure. What is your opinion on this? One's for you, Dylan? What is your opinion on the treatment of queer content creators on social media? So Guild service, you, oh, stop.

Chris:

wait treatment. Can you elaborate on that?

Eric:

How social media platforms treat queer content creators as far as when they put content out there for consumption.

Chris:

I can't answer that right now. I'm gonna, okay. Use your guys as examples.

Gil:

how to interpret it. Dylan, kick us off with this.

Dylan:

No, basically I don't know. I just feel, it might not exactly be directly the platform's fault. It's probably mostly the people who are on it that are homophobic that are like, oh, you're an underwear. That's a fucking problem. Or like your S is out, but Hey, over here on Playboy, this woman has full NPS out. And that's okay. Cuz we like her NPS. That's where it gets problematic. I don't know. I also just feel like with Instagram, which is where I'm having most of my issues you should just have an adult filter, like Twitter. So you just switch on like adult content. And also if you don't like something, don't look at it. It's very simple. I hope that was

Gil:

coherent.

Dylan:

Yeah. Do you want me to elaborate

Eric:

or if you want to,

Dylan:

do you have examples now, Chris, or I,

Chris:

I, I think I get it now. okay, great.

Gil:

Dylan's showing ass and HES having issue. I

Eric:

mean, you're not the only one either. I see it happen to you a lot because I follow you on social media platforms, but it happened to a lot of like Brazilian porn stars too. Like their Twitters just got like completely shut down. And a lot of porn stars are Twitters. Just got shut down. Rahe. That's happened to him like two or three times now. And wow. So it's something that you see universally. And so I think it, I personally think it is an issue and I think that it's being quote, unquote, I don't wanna say marketed, but marketed as oh, it's just going against community policies and guidelines. But like you said, like you have this woman who, or this straight model who's showing just as much or more, and they're not getting flagged for it.

Dylan:

The images are also gorgeous. They're artsy. They're

Eric:

beautiful. Absolutely. You take beautiful photos.

Dylan:

Oh, you're too kind. You haven't seen the ugly ones. No

Eric:

but the ones you put out there, of

Dylan:

course. Yeah. But like I shared like. Picture from Playboy, which is a verified account on my story. It got taken down for sexual solicitation. It just seems a bit double standard and I really hate hypocrisy. I think it's the fucking worst anyway,

Eric:

anyone else?

Chris:

Okay, so I can go so I follow this tick, tick Tucker mercury, the trans Hedi ma and she just helps people just, like, how do you fix this yourself? It's so easy. Instead of you don't need to hire a professional. Who's like, when it's something simple, obviously she's hire someone if it's a little bit more complicated, but and then there are times where she. Posts like, like at the top corner where it says like a comment that somebody has left and it's somebody and she tries to really overpower and take control and of the situation. And I, I applaud her because there's some very hateful people out there and

Gil:

the

Chris:

it's very saddening to see that she's not being like stripping or she's not doing anything. She's not oh, you need to be telling people how they should feel. She's just like doing her thing. Like I know how to fix things, and this is showing the everyday person and there's people out there just because who she is and they're just viewing hate. So I feel like the Karens and the Todds or whatever, the male equivalent should. if they don't like it, like Dylan said, don't watch it. That is not a space for you to throw hate. And it is unfair. Some people get shut down because of certain content, but like on the opposite spectrum, there's the same thing. Just different scenario, or like different people, cisgendered and straight and stuff like that. So there is hypocrisy that does Neo stop. So I it's, yeah, that's unfair. And I think if just some Christians Neo Christian specifically is that they pick and choose and it's either all or you can't like, you shouldn't be picking and choosing. No.

Gil:

It's I was gonna say it's interesting because it's like the, if it's showing skin, God forbid, cuz we all have that. Then it's immediately flagged, but if you're talking white supremacists, potentially the previous president, trying to tear down the government, then that is not flagged at all on social media or it's temporarily for 30 minutes, give or take taken down. And that is in itself protected, which is very, I find very peculiar versus showing body parts or showing any to me, you're just showing your every, we all have the same thing. Like it's very, I

Chris:

don't what these, yeah. Kids that can't go to drag queen drag shows, I'm like, are you serious? Like you've been to like football beer Stuff like you see girls like at Hooters probably more slutty dressed than a drag queen. You can be. And it's okay. Yeah, sure. Let's go with that. Sarcastically. Of course,

Jeremy:

I don't understand people's hangups on nudity to begin with. I think it's just strange. And I think the fact that people are disturbed by it is way more unnatural than nudity itself. Because it's the most natural thing in the world. In regards to like the topic. It's a tough one for me. In a couple of ways, first off, I think there's very easy solution. It's just like what Dylan was saying. You quit an adult sensitivity content. There's ways that you can really easily avoid this kind of stuff, but it's again, as a company, I think you have the right to decide what you want to do and what you don't wanna do. However, I feel like with social media in particular, especially with these large platforms that have become more of like monopolies within the category of it, it's like, how do you. Moderate something like social network, because if it's about socialization, it's about discussion. It covers topics like politics, religion sexuality, all the spectrum of the human existence. And so to pick and choose. How do you determine and pick and choose which part of, I feel like there's a lot of ethical dilemma with that. And I think it's a hard one to discuss, but honestly, it's if you don't wanna look at it, don't look at it. And if you don't want your kids to look at it, I either be involved in what they're consuming or take the proper, seek the, tell the program to put something on there, like a childhood. I don't know. It just it seems like very simple to me to fix. Like this, I can understand how programs like Instagram or Facebook may be trying to, they're being more swayed by advertisers than anything, because they want to keep that delicate balance of, okay, if this platform doesn't become it, family friendly or family friendly, in our sense, in their sense, advertisers no longer want to work with us. If advertisers don't wanna work with us, we have a large source of income cut off from us, and we become more of a niche category. We don't have the larger consumer market. So I like understand the, their mindset when it comes to that kind of stuff. But I just feel like there are so many really easy solutions. You could come up to this to keep it inclusive, to allow people to post what they wanna pose. And still just I feel like there's a very easy solution to it. And I think people just need to mind their own business and leave people alone.

Cisco:

You guys have pretty much said everything that I was thinking, on so many different levels like Dylan said, like I've I've seen there as a clear discrimination against gay body, or I should say male bodies or gay content on social media. Like we've experienced it just even with my company. We'll both like a completely like non-sexual ad, like someone with a coffee cup standing in their underwear and it gets reported. And then again, I see the females, like with some really if you go to like fashion Nova's page They have some really like racey stuff on there. And I think it, it does, it's not only just gay people though. I think it just goes back to either how famous you are, how many followers you have or how much advertising you're doing. Because I've seen some gay brands that do some pretty racey stuff as well. I don't know if they're getting but I feel like oftentimes if you're spending money with the platform, they're possibly less likely, or if you bring them notoriety, just the former president. But in the end you have to realize that you're playing on their turf. So like these free speech laws or whatnot, don't really apply because you're on their platform. Okay. They're not preventing you from going and talking in the town square town, saying you hate somebody like you're on their platform. You have to play by their rules. That's really what it comes down to. And unfortunately that's just how it is. But I do see it clear, like it, it seems like in the past I've seen some double standards go on

Gil:

Eric final thoughts,

Eric:

huh? No, I just I think we all talked about a little bit. I just wanna thank you guys all for joining us for this little tea time. Yeah. Thank you. You guys are always welcome to join us back. Anyone who ha wants to drop social so people can follow you feel free to do so right now, anyone? No. You could

Cisco:

check me out at yo Cisco a at at Y O C I S C O and that's on Instagram and Facebook.

Eric:

Awesome. Anyone else?

Chris:

No, my Tumblr. Just kidding.

Cisco:

Stop. My only fans,

Chris:

my Facebook,

Gil:

no Facebook, MySpace, my

Dylan:

space,

Eric:

my space. Thank you all for joining us. And we will actually not be dropping an episode this next week, cuz Gill and Chris will be in Canada, celebrating Gill's birthday. So happy birthday to Gill, birthday Gill. Thank you. And yeah, we'll be with you in a couple weeks, so thank you guys. Thank you guys. All for joining us Bye.

Gil:

thank you for listening to us. We hope you enjoyed your time in The Q Lounge. If you have any questions, comments, suggestions on topics, or if you would like to be a guest or contributor, please email us info.TheQlounge@gmail.Com or through our contact page at theqloungepodcast.com. Don't forget to subscribe to continue listening wherever you get your podcasts. If you want to be our sugar, daddy hit that donation button.

Eric:

Until next time live in your authenticity.